Ports of Auckland Eyes Shore-Based Power for Cruise Ships

New Zealand’s Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL) has commissioned a feasibility study to look at alternative methods for powering cruise ships when in port.

​The study will investigate powering ships from the national grid, known as cold ironing, as well as a range of alternatives including LNG or methanol-powered barges to generate ship’s power, and the use of low-sulphur fuels to reduce emissions.

“Currently ships in port need to keep their generators running to supply on-board power. By providing shore-based power, Ports of Auckland would be able to reduce locally generated emissions and shipping’s carbon footprint, supporting Auckland Council’s carbon reduction goals,” POAL said.

The study supports the port’s “goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2025 and having zero emissions by 2040,” ​Ports of Auckland CEO Tony Gibson said, adding that the port will initially look at the feasibility of providing alternative power just for cruise ships, but it aims to extend that across the whole port longer term.

“In carrying out the study, we will work closely with Vector to understand the capability of the local grid, and with cruise lines to understand their capabilities and future requirements,” Gibson said.

The study is due to be completed by April 2017.

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