MPHRP Outraged by Court Decision to Compensate Pirates

Decision of the European Court of Human Rights is repugnant and insulting to all seafarers who have survived piracy attacks, the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme (MPHRP) said in a reaction to  the news that the French government has been ordered to pay thousands in compensation to Somali pirates.

The Somali pirates were caught on the high seas by the French army on two separate occasions in 2008, and taken back to France for trial.

However, the pirates, who attacked French ships, will receive compensation from the French Government, as, according to a rulling by the EU Human Rights Court, pirates’ human rights have been violated since the French authorities failed to present “promptly” the accused men before a judge upon their arrival to the country resulting in 48-hour delay.

France has been ordered to pay from £1,578 – £3,945 to each Somali pirate for their ‘moral damages’ as well as from £2,367 to £7,100 to cover each of the pirate’s legal costs.

In the ruling, the ECHR acknowledged the French were operating under ‘completely exceptional circumstances’ – the arrest took place ‘more than 4,000 miles from French territory – which explained the long detention without seeing a judge but the ECHR judges ruled that France needs to compensate the pirates as the French Army ‘took too long to bring the pirates before a judge’.

Roy Paul Programme Director for MPHRP said, “This decision would be unbelievable if it wasn’t made by the European Court of Human Rights. The claim that this constituted a ‘violation of their rights to freedom and security,’ is an insult to the seafarers and yachtsmen they attacked as surely this is the true violation of the seafarers’ rights to freedom and security. These Pirates, in my opinion, gave up any of their rights when they set sail to attack innocent seafarers who were simply doing their essential work”.

Chirag Barhi MPHRP South Asia regional director who survived 8 months at the hands of pirates in 2010 and has met many of the survivors who have suffered various forms of torture and had their rights to freedom and security violated said, “I am sure all those Seafarers, their families, relatives, friends and many in the maritime industry who ever had suffered due to this piracy menace‎, will surely feel very annoyed to hear this judgement. The seafarers held by Pirates such as the ones caught by France have been held up to four years and no court has ever awarded them anything for their ‘moral damages’ ”.

Pirate attacks off Somalia have been reduced in recent years, with international fleets patrolling the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean and ships adopting the best management practices as set out in BMP4, as well as armed guards being employed aboard many vessels. At their peak in January 2011, Somali pirates held 736 hostages and 32 boats, some onshore and others on their vessels.

Roy Paul said, “I hope that the States in the European Union will look very seriously at this judgement and get it reversed as it is an insult to all in the maritime industry especially as the judgement was made just before a Vietnamese seafarer was murdered by Pirates in an attack on board his vessel.

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3 thoughts on “MPHRP Outraged by Court Decision to Compensate Pirates”

  1. This is the height of stupidity by the ECHR and will only make piracy MORE lucrative. Now you can purposely get caught, get treated better than you did in somalia, and then get PAID for attacking merchants. Its perfect…. if you are a pirate. The ECHR should have to pay out penalties to the families of ALL merchants killed or captured by somali pirates. I am sure when they see THEY will have to pay for someone elses criminal behavior this stupidity will end.

  2. Except for the fact that the pirates will be imprisoned for nearly a decade, stop looking at it from your point of view and start looking at it from theirs. Their waters have been emptied, where they once were able to provide for their families with fish and be able to sell them, the industrial fishing boats have now and have been over the years fishing the seas close to shore empty of any and all fish. They are not pirates for the fun of things, they do not want the military presence of the NATO in that area. Agreed it is completely disgusting to hijack families and innocent shippers but how else are they going to get attention, by appealing to the better nature of fishermen from Asia and other parts of the world dumping their dirty laundry there??

    “A United Nations report and several news sources have suggested that the piracy off the coast of Somalia was caused in part by illegal fishing.[6][7] According to the DIW and the US House Armed Services Committee, the dumping of toxic waste in Somali waters by foreign vessels also severely constrained the ability of local fishermen to earn a living. In response, the fishermen began forming armed groups to stop the foreign ships. They eventually turned to hijacking commercial vessels for ransom as an alternate source of income.[5][8] In 2009, a survey by WardheerNews found that approximately 70 percent of the local coastal communities at the time “strongly support[ed] the piracy as a form of national defense of the country’s territorial waters”. The pirates also believed that they were protecting their fishing grounds and exacting justice and compensation for the marine resources stolen”
    There is a price to pay for stealing from innocent people and dumping toxic waste in the region with the second largest untouched corall reef in the world, too bad people have to die for this to get through.

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